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Our Global Sharing Team loves teaching people how to transition too loving, safe, moneyless, abundant, clean, healthy and beautiful global communities. We are a growing & connecting to millions of free houses, free global communities, sharing communities, cool off the grid cash jobs, free education, free holistic healthcare, heal the planet and create a life of pure love & gratitude. Please gift us a loving donation so we can build free sustainable homes with organic edible gardens… for homeless Vets, Seniors, the handicap and anyone who wants healthy cool housing for all. (Building a Free House cost from $3000 to $10,000)

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Author: BrainMan (Verified Member)
Category: communities
Date: November 25, 2017
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Earn $20 Plus with Cool Side Gigs! (Make Money while Walking Around.)

If you wear or carry anything that displays a brand name or logo on it, you’re already a walking advertisement.

So why not get paid for it?

One startup is making that happen in a unique way.

Nomad Technologies, a Bellevue, Washington-based marketing platform, pays people to advertise for brands by walking around densely-populated areas with tablets displaying messages attached to their backpacks.

Nomad’s approach to advertising takes what would be a stagnant message on a sign or billboard and makes it mobile. The messages grab attention in a crowd like a sign spinner or a mascot might — they’re just geared for the 21st century.

Founder and CEO Jonah Friedl launched Nomad on the campus of Washington State University two years ago when he was still a student.

Friedl told us his plans for growth include bringing money-making opportunities to many more college students — and those who’ve long left college days behind.

‘Like Uber for Advertising’

Friedl described Nomad as being like “Uber for advertising” in that brands can launch advertising campaigns in almost any market, bringing work to people nationwide. Several of its clients, including Zipcar, Timberland, YouTube and LimeBike, are brands that advertise all across the country.

Nomad has branched out since its start at Washington State University. Friedl said the company is active on over 13 college campuses, including Stanford University, University of Washington, University of Texas – Austin, Boston University, New York University and Georgia Tech.

He plans to have coverage at 100 campuses and in 20 major metropolitan areas by the end of 2018.

Nomad also mimics popular ridesharing companies in other ways, particularly in the flexibility of the work. Those who sign on with the platform (fittingly referred to as Nomads) have the flexibility of choosing when they want to work.

Friedl said Nomads are paid between $10 and $20 an hour, with pay varying in the way that surge pricing works.

“They’re incentivized to walk during busy times and in busy areas,” he said. “Nomads get bonuses based on the more people they get in front of.”

Friedl said Nomad’s app will alert workers to special events, such as an on-campus concert, where they can have a chance to make more money.

What’s Needed to Become a Nomad

Friedl said Nomad has a network of over 2,000 people, ranging from college students to senior citizens. The startup continually welcomes more to join its ranks.

Those who end up being a good fit for the company are those who are easily able to speak to what the ad is selling.

“If it’s a campaign with Timberland — who’s a customer of ours at Stanford — we make sure those students are hiking enthusiasts, outdoor enthusiasts [and] already a fan of the brand so they’re extremely excited to be brought in to be representing it,” Friedl said. “Going into it, they’re well versed to speak on behalf of the quality of the product.”

Potential Nomads must check off boxes about their interests on the application, and they’re asked to give their social media handles so the company can match people up with the right ad campaigns.

Signing Up to Be a Walking Sign

Friedl said after the initial application review, applicants must complete an interview process.

“We do over-the-phone and Skype interviews with every single person that we hire,” he said.

If a campaign is not available when a person signs up to work for Nomad, their information is kept on a waiting list until workers are needed. That waiting period is sometimes as long as four weeks, Friedl said.

The wait time can be shorter in the areas where Nomad is already established, such as the college campuses in which they’ve deployed and in cities like Seattle, New York, San Francisco, Los Angeles and San Diego, he said.

“Those are really popular markets where we get a ton of requests and people stay pretty busy,” Friedl said.

Nomads are only assigned to work one campaign at a time. If they don’t already own a tablet, they can lease one through the company.

To make sure they’ll have the perfect response when a passerby stops to ask them about the ad on their backpack, brands provide the company with a one-pager with pertinent information.

“We run that through our system so that all the Nomads, a week in advance, are trained up and quizzed up on what they’re going to be promoting,” Friedl said.

More Than Just Money

Nomad may be a great way for people to earn money, but it also has a charitable aim to help the communities where it’s active.

Friedl said the company recently gave workers at Stanford University the option to divert 20% of their pay for one week to the American Red Cross’ disaster relief in the wake of the northern California fires — with Nomad matching the contributions.

It issued a similar invitation to Texas workers in the wake of Hurricane Harvey.

“We’re really big advocates of local philanthropy at the micro level,” Friedl said.

To sign up to work for Nomad, click here.

Nicole Dow is a staff writer at The Penny Hoarder.

Author: BrainMan (Verified Member)
Category: Amazing People, communities
Date: October 30, 2017
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“WHITE” SCIENTIST WHISTLE-BLOWER: “THE BLACKS” ARE TARGETED BY THE MEDICAL SYSTEM!

Become vegan and move away from the American system. Enter

Author: Lovely (Verified Member)
Category: amazing, communities, free housing project
Date: September 26, 2016
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Build a Earthship and Have a Place to Go when the World Ends!

Help Us Build Free Sustainable Houses w/ Organic Edible Gardens. Enter

Author: Lovely (Verified Member)
Category: amazing, communities, free housing project
Date: September 23, 2016
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Build a Tiny Home in a Week for $2000 or less. (When you’ve had enough of America!)

Large windows make use of natural light in this home on Cortes Island, British Columbia.

Build a Tiny Home in a Week for $2000 or less.

Author: Lovely (Verified Member)
Category: communities, education, free housing project
Date: September 18, 2016
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Protected: 6 ‘Moneyless Global Communities’. (Millions of Views) Walk away from money, today!

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Author: Lovely (Verified Member)
Category: communities, education, food
Date: May 13, 2016
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3 Simple Steps to Finding Free Housing & Free Food in California. (Learn to live without money.)

Author: Hotep Oi (Verified Member)
Category: amazing, communities, education
Date: April 13, 2016
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Athletes & Celebrities for IMMEDIATE Global Justice! (We have the power to change the laws, Today!)

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Author: BrainMan (Verified Member)
Category: communities, Wow!
Date: December 10, 2015
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The Master List of the Collaborative Economy: Rent and Trade Everything
If this information helped, please make a loving donation, so, we can build free houses with edible gardens for the homeless. Love you!
Author: BrainMan (Verified Member)
Category: communities, education, Wow!
Date: October 22, 2015
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Unschooling is the Future!

Free Your Mind is 100% for ‘Unschooling’!  Teach your kids the truth, allow them to explore the world. No need for competition, grades or learning through shame.  Let them learn and experience a skill they love — that will empower them to create abundance from their heart. Checkout Unschooling.com

Author: BrainMan (Verified Member)
Category: communities, free resources, videos & news
Date: April 16, 2014
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Protected: Sharing Community Members Area

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Author: BrainMan (Verified Member)
Category: communities
Date: January 28, 2014
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How to Start Your Own Country!

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How to Start Your Own Country in Four Easy Steps

With Kosovo unilaterally declaring independence and a host of wannabe states looking to follow its lead, you might be thinking it’s about time to set up your own country. You’ve picked out a flag, written a national anthem, even printed up money with your face on it. But what’s the next step? Creating a new country isn’t as easy as you think.

Step 1: Make sure you are eligible

As tempting as it might be to declare your cubicle a sovereign state, customary international law actually does specify minimum standards for statehood.

 

You must have a defined territory. You must have a permanent population. You must have a government. Your government must be capable of interacting with other states. (This one is somewhat controversial. It was included as a qualification in the 1933 Montevideo Convention, which established the United States good neighbor policy of nonintervention in Latin America, but is generally not recognized as international law.)

 

Step 2: Declare independence

Congratulations on joining the ranks of Transnistria, Somaliland, and a host of other countries that won’t be marching at the Olympics anytime soon. Just because you’ve met the qualifications and declared yourself independent doesn’t mean that you’re going to be taken seriously. Even the Principality of Sealand located on a 10,000-square-foot platform in the North Sea has tried with mixed success to claim sovereignty under these qualifications.

 

However, now that your state is established, there are certain benefits you can expect, even if you’re not recognized by anyone. Once an entity has established itself as a de facto state, it will benefit from territorial integrity and certain guarantees of sovereignty, says Stefan Talmon, professor of public international law at OxfordUniversity and author of Recognition in International Law. For instance, now that Kosovo is established as a state, Serbia can no longer freely attack it to bring it back into Serbia. It benefits from the prohibition of the use of force under the U.N. Charter. These rules were established during the Cold War to protect new states that were not yet recognized by one bloc or another.

Step 3: Get recognized

There’s not much point in having your own country unless other countries acknowledge your existence. International recognition is what gives a country legitimacy in the international community and what ultimately distinguishes the New Zealand‘s of the world from the Nagorno-Karabakh’s. Naturally, though, the established countries are going to take some convincing. Recognition is quite complicated because it combines international law and international politics, Talmon says. Some people say that recognition is a purely political act. It is at the discretion of existing states whether they recognize, so there is no right to recognition.

This was especially true during the Cold War, when the national legitimacy of North and South Vietnam, North and South Korea, and East and West Germany depended on which side you asked. Even today, a number of entities are recognized as states by some countries, but not by others. Palestine, Taiwan, and Northern Cyprus fall into this category.

 

The United States has no official policy on what is required for recognition, according to its State Department. Instead, the decision to recognize a state is made by the president. Then the president decides whether to establish diplomatic relations with the state based on U.S. national interests. There’s no cookie-cutter approach, so when you ask for recognition, be sure to explain how your independence will be good for America. In the old days, proving your anti-communist creed was usually good enough. Today, U.S. strategic priorities are a bit more complex, though as Kosovo proves, ticking off the Russians still helps.

 

Step 4: Join the club

Since its founding in 1945, membership in the United Nations has become the gold standard of international legitimacy. When you are admitted to the U.N, that’s a form of approval, Talmon says. Its like a stamp [that says] you are now a full member of the international community.

 

Applying for U.N. membership is a breeze. According to U.N. rules, all you need to do is write a letter to the secretary-general requesting membership. These letters are remarkably short and simple. For a handy template, check out the successful application of Montenegro, the United Nations most recent member.

You can mail your application to:

Ban Ki-moon
Secretary-General
The
United Nations
First Ave.
at 46th St.
New York, NY10017

 

Now comes the hard part. The Security Council must refer you to the General Assembly, which must determine by a two-thirds majority that you are a peace-loving state that can carry out the duties of the U.N. Charter.

It’s probably not even worth trying this unless you’ve completed step 3. A number of unrecognized states have applied for U.N. recognition over the years, including American-Indian tribes, but without the credibility bestowed by bilateral recognition; these applications are usually just filed away.

 

The biggest obstacle to U.N. membership is power politics. Neither North nor South Korea got U.N. membership until 1991 because of vetoes by one bloc or another during the Cold War. Even today, Russians veto on the Security Council will probably prevent Kosovo from gaining a seat at the table anytime soon. The Republic of China, a.k.a. Taiwan, was one of the founding members of the United Nations and once had a permanent seat on the Security Council. But Taiwan was booted out in favor of the Peoples Republic of China in 1971, after U.S. President Richard Nixon decided to cozy up to Beijing. The Taiwanese government has applied for membership every year since 1993, but to no avail. The United Nations didn’t even bother to open Taiwan‘s most recent letter.

 

As you can see, the point at which a territory officially becomes a country is very much in the eyes of the beholder. International recognition can be an elusive prize. The good news? The longer you wait, the better your chances become. In international law, which is often based on custom, the longer you can maintain your de facto sovereignty, the more likely you are to be accepted. (Unless, of course, you’re Taiwan.)

 

The strength of Kosovo’s bid for independence from Serbia is based largely on the fact that it has, for all intents and purposes, been independent for almost a decade. In a more extreme example, the 900-year-old Sovereign Order of Malta has diplomatic relations with 100 countries and observer status at the United Nations even though its entire territory is contained in a few buildings in Rome. So don’t be discouraged. Starting your own country isn’t impossible. It’s just going to require a lot of patience and the right friends.

 BY Joshua Keating

 

Author: BrainMan (Verified Member)
Category: communities, free tools, shelter, videos & news
Date: November 2, 2013
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Organic Food Movement | Andrew McFarlane – CHI THANG | #1 Staff Pick!

We love Andrew! You must join The Free Organic Food Movement and stop buying food! https://www.facebook.com/Freeorganicfoodmovement

Feel free and donate to Andrew McFarlane on his video | http://andrewmcfarlane.bandcamp.com/track/chi-thang

 

Author: BrainMan (Verified Member)
Category: communities, ebooks, food, videos & news, visionaries
Date: March 1, 2013
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Car Free Zones Cities… is this our future?

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Urban planners and designers in Hamburg, Germany are working on a plan which aims to eliminate the need for cars in the city over the next 20 years. The project will help to turn the city into a one-of-a-kind, integrated system that could well be adopted by other major cities around the world.

While cars have become a serious cause of environmental, social and aesthetic problems in modern cities, Hamburg’s Green Network Plan will create pedestrian and bike lanes to connect the city’s existing green areas, providing safe, car-free commuter routes.

 

The plan will be developed over the next 15 to 20 years and will connect major parks, playgrounds, community gardens, and cemeteries in Germany’s second-largest city. The resulting network will cover 40 per cent of the urban area and should enable commuters and tourists to move around the city entirely by bike or by foot.

Rapid population growth within urban areas is leading to growing traffic congestion, which has many side effects. One of the most pressing problems is parking, especially in city centres. Long delays getting to and from work causes frustration, which leads to more accidents.

But the most serious problem caused by cars is the air pollution they produce, which exacerbates global warming. In the case of Hamburg, over the past 60 years they city’s average temperature has increased by 9° Celsius. Sea levels have risen by 20 centimetres and they are expected to increase another 30 centimetres by 2100.

The proposed car-free plan was created to reduce carbon dioxide emissions, while the expanded green spaces the plans suggests along the new, green paths will also help to alleviate flooding in the event of heavy rainfall and big storms.

At least 2,000 residents of Brussels took to the streets to demand more room for pedestrians and cyclists in the city centre.

Brussels-ResidentsThe new green network also aims to improve the overall health of the city and its inhabitants. City of Hamburg spokesperson Angelika Fritsch explained the project will offer people opportunities to hike, swim, do water sports, enjoy picnics and restaurants, experience calm and watch nature and wildlife right in the city.

“That reduces the need to take the car for weekend outings outside the city,” she said.

The project is part of a growing trend, particularly within Europe, to create cycling networks that spread beyond city centres, connecting cities with their suburbs.

Brussels, the capital and largest city of Belgium and one of Europe’s most congested cities, is also contemplating going car-free. Brussels’ plan is to turn the city’s central axis into a pedestrian zone, transforming an existing four-lane boulevard and a string of squares into a long, café-filled promenade.

The new zone will be connected with an existing pedestrian area in the narrow streets around the city’s Grand Place and Rue Neuve, turning Brussels’ core into a spacious, rambling open-air meeting space.

 

Denmark capital city, Copenhagen, has undertaken perhaps the most ambitious of these plans with the construction of 26 bicycle “superhighways” that extend out from the city centre as part of the city’s goal to become carbon neutral by 2050.

Source: http://sourceable.net/will-cities-future-car-free-zones/

While cars have become a serious cause of environmental, social and aesthetic problems in modern cities, Hamburg’s Green Network Plan will create pedestrian and bike lanes to connect the city’s existing green areas, providing safe, car-free commuter routes.

The plan will be developed over the next 15 to 20 years and will connect major parks, playgrounds, community gardens, and cemeteries in Germany’s second-largest city. The resulting network will cover 40 per cent of the urban area and should enable commuters and tourists to move around the city entirely by bike or by foot.

– See more at: http://sourceable.net/will-cities-future-car-free-zones/#sthash.2uhI4qQJ.dpuf

 

Urban planners and designers in Hamburg, Germany are working on a plan which aims to eliminate the need for cars in the city over the next 20 years. The project will help to turn the city into a one-of-a-kind, integrated system that could well be adopted by other major cities around the world. – See more at: http://sourceable.net/will-cities-future-car-free-zones/#sthash.2uhI4qQJ.dpuf
Urban planners and designers in Hamburg, Germany are working on a plan which aims to eliminate the need for cars in the city over the next 20 years. The project will help to turn the city into a one-of-a-kind, integrated system that could well be adopted by other major cities around the world. – See more at: http://sourceable.net/will-cities-future-car-free-zones/#sthash.2uhI4qQJ.dpuf
Author: BrainMan (Verified Member)
Category: communities, free resources, videos & news
Date: February 8, 2013
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Russell Simmons: Happiness and TM Meditation

 

Author: Hotep Oi (Verified Member)
Category: communities, free resources, videos & news
Date: March 26, 2012
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